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Germany

Each course is worth one full-year credit and is contingent on adequate enrolment. Students are not permitted to register for more than one course.

Classes take place Monday to Thursday, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Mandatory field trips are an integral part of each course and may occur outside of class time on afternoons or Fridays.

Please note that, because there is no local university hosting this program, students will not have access to school library, computer or sports facilities. However, there are many internet cafés and public libraries in Berlin, as well as wifi available at the apartments.

Courses

POL300Y0 Topics in Comparative Politics: Contested Boundaries – Immigration, Citizenship, and Multiculturalism in Germany and Europe

POL300Y0 Topics in Comparative Politics: Contested Boundaries – Immigration, Citizenship, and Multiculturalism in Germany and Europe

Immigration and the integration of newcomers are among the politically most contested issues in Europe today. Using primarily the German experience as a case study, this seminar in comparative politics examines the historical evolution and current policies and practices of immigration and integration to critically engage with questions of citizenship, belonging, diversity and multiculturalism in present-day Europe. Students will learn about the history of immigration to Western Europe after World War II; the political tension between cultural pluralism and national identity; the evolution of policies and practices of immigrant integration, citizenship and multiculturalism at the local, national and supra-national level; the rise of anti-immigrant populism; and social movements resisting racism and social exclusion.

Seminar-style classes with active student participation and responsibility will be supplemented by field trips, walking tours, and guest speakers. By the end of the course, students will be able to (1) distinguish and apply various concepts and theories relevant for the comparative study of migration policy; (2) describe the history and politics of migration to Germany and Western Europe; and (3) identify and critically evaluate contemporary developments in the field of immigration policy.
POL300Y – 2020 Draft Course Outline

Prerequisites

1.0 POL credit or relevant academic preparation
BR=3

Field Trips

Students will visit the German Historical Museum, the Jewish Museum Berlin and the House of the Wannsee Conference, and will have a guided tour of immigrant district Kreuzberg (all in Berlin). There will also be a four-day trip to Brussels and Antwerp (Belgium) where students will attend talks at the European Commission, meet with local NGOs and travel to Antwerp to visit the city’s integration office.

The cost of the trips is:

  • CAD$600, paid to U of T for roundtrip flight to Brussels, train fare from Brussels to Antwerp, three nights accommodation in Brussels, museum entrance fees and guided tours.
  • CAD$115, paid onsite for meals and some public transit in Berlin and Brussels.

Instructor

Ahmed Allahwala is Associate Professor (Teaching Stream) in City Studies at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC). Originally from Germany, Dr. Allahwala holds an M.A. from FU Berlin and a PhD in Political Science from York University in Toronto. As a critical policy analyst, Dr. Allahwala’s work focuses on urban social policy within the context of contemporary state and economic restructuring in North America and Western Europe. Dr. Allahwala has taught a wide variety of courses in Germany and Canada on topics including welfare state analysis, immigration and settlement, city politics, community-based research, and urban planning. His pedagogical innovations in experiential learning and community-university partnerships have been recognized both nationally and internationally. He was the recipient of the Government of Canada Award and a teaching fellow at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies in Berlin.

 

GER354Y0 Special Topics: A Tale of More than Two Cities

GER354Y0 Special Topics: A Tale of More than Two Cities

A wall once divided Germany’s capital in two. Yet Berlin has always been much more than two cities. It is perhaps best described, in the words of author Zafer Senocak, as “the capital of the fragment.” Since the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990, Berlin has become a space of cultural diversity, national memory and constant transformation. This course is an exploration of the diversity and richness of Berlin today and of the various cultural influences that have shaped the city over time. We will focus on contemporary fictionalizations of Berlin as the divided/reunited city, drawing particular attention to the voices of Jews and Turks, the two largest ethnic/religious minorities in Berlin’s history. The course demands active engagement with the city. The main goal of the course is to provide a variety of entry points to the metropolis that inspire students to venture out and discover their own versions of Berlin. Central texts will be made available prior to departure for Germany, and there will be a preliminary assignment to set the tone for the initial encounter with Berlin.

GER354Y – 2020 Draft Course Outline

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: None
Recommended Preparation:100-level HIS/POL/GER course/International or European Studies
BR=1

Field Trips

This course will incorporate visits to numerous neighbourhoods and museums in Berlin. Examples include the Jewish Museum, German Historical Museum, the Stasi Museum, a guided tour of Bayerischer Platz and an evening at the theatre. The cost of the trips is CAD$260, paid to U of T for return transportation, some entry fees and guided tours and CAD$100 to be paid onsite for local excursions and transportation.

Instructor

Hang-Sun Kim holds a PhD in Germanic Languages and Literatures from Harvard University and is Assistant Professor (Teaching Stream) of German at the University of Toronto, where she coordinates the language program and teaches German language and literature courses on topics such as the role of memory in postwar German literature, literature in translation, and the representation of real and imagined cities. Her current research interests include foreign language pedagogy, theories and representations of urban life, and translingual literature by transcultural German-language authors.