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Ecuador

The University of Toronto will offer one virtual course focusing on Ecuador. The course is worth one half credit (0.5 FCE) and is contingent on adequate enrolment. Classes will be held from Monday to  Thursday  from 9 am to 11 am, Toronto time (EST). 

ENV382H0 Special Topics: Introduction to Ecuador

This online course will offer an introductory exploration of this Latin American country. Based on readings, lectures, guest lectures, experiential activities, and discussions, we will discover the geography and geology, ecology, history, culture and economy as well as its social and political evolution and current issues. Throughout the course, students will work on projects that will allow them to actively explore and study a wide range of subjects and contexts. 

Prerequisites: none
BR= none
2021 Draft Course Outline

NOTE: In future, Summer Abroad will offer two on-site courses focusing on Ecuador, with three weeks in-country for each course (offered in alternate summers): 

  • ENV395Y0 Field Course in the Andes, the Cloud Forest, and the Amazon 
  • ENV396Y0* Field Course in the Pacific Coast and the Galápagos Islands  (*course code TBC)

Taking the 2021 “Introduction to Ecuador” online course will not prevent students from taking either or both of the Field Courses in the future; there are no exclusions. 

Instructors

Professor Barbara Murck is Professor, Teaching Stream, at the Department of Geography, University of Toronto Mississauga. A geologist by training, she completed her undergraduate degree at Princeton University and her graduate degree at the University of Toronto.  Prof. Murck is the author of many textbooks on geology and environmental science.  She is an award-winning lecturer, and was the recipient of the President’s Teaching Award in 2010.  Prof. Murck has been involved with many international development projects in environmental management, from Niger, Ivory Coast, and Sudan to China, Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.

Christoph Richter is an Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, in the Department of Biology at University of Toronto Mississauga. Working on a M.Sc. at Memorial University of Newfoundland, and a PhD at Otago University in New Zealand, his research focused on the influence of human activities on the behaviour of cetaceans. Currently, he is involved in research on the ecological impact of invasive species around Mississauga and on the Galápagos Islands, on the impact and prevalence of transformative learning, and on relationship between stress and incidences of plagiarism . He has taught field courses in the Bay of Fundy, Gulf of Maine, and Ecuador, and has been a study leader on cruises to the Arctic, Haida Gwaii and the Antarctic.