Birds eye view of Oxford

England

Each course is worth one full-year credit and is contingent on adequate enrolment. Students are not permitted to register for more than one course.

Classes will take place Monday to Thursday from approximately 9:00 am to 12:00 pm (Toronto time).  A detailed schedule will be available at the time of admission.   

Courses

CRI389Y0 Topics in Criminology: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities in Criminal Law: Historical Origins and New Directions in England and Canada

CRI389Y0 Topics in Criminology: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities in Criminal Law: Historical Origins and New Directions in England and Canada

This course traces shifts in the rights, freedoms and responsibilities of legal subjects, as they have been defined in criminal law in England and Canada, beginning with the gradual emergence of the common law in England during the Medieval period, right up to the present day, including the history of approaches to political violence in England. Close attention will be paid to recent developments that challenge traditional doctrines. The English legal system has recently adopted a number of innovations and proposals that have not been tried in Canada, including new doctrines regarding police administration, antisocial behaviour, community policing, speech supporting terrorism and jury trials. In all these cases, there is significant modification of established legal doctrines regarding the relationship between the state and its subjects. The new Conservative government has modified some of these policies, partly in light of fiscal challenges. Canada has been at the forefront of other developments that modify that relationship, most notably regarding dangerousness assessment with a view to preventive detention, and the punishment of women offenders, where feminist theories have been influential. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate these developments in light of the history of legal rights, freedoms and responsibilities in the common law tradition. They will present their views of the nature, causes and validity of the developments in the written assignments. The course will be of special interest to students of Criminology, Political Science and History.

Prerequisites: none
BR=3
2021 Preliminary Course Outline

Virtual Field Trips

  • Virtual tours of a number of museums and other sites.
  • Guest speakers with experience in criminal justice issues in the UK will participate
  • Online materials for an enhanced sense of British history and culture, such as:
    • A brief visual history of British architecture, with a special focus on Oxford
    • A brief sound history of British music 
    • A brief visual history of British sport
    • A brief history of British food, with simple recipes

Instructor

William Watson received his B.Sc. from the University of Leicester, and his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. His academic interests include the practice of forensic psychiatry, psychopathy, the provision of services to sub-populations of mentally disordered offenders who are identified, or self-identified, as having special needs, and the place of critical social science in public policy making. His publications include The Mentally Disordered Offender in an Era of Community Care: New Directions in Provision (co-edited with A. Grounds), and articles in Sociology, The International Journal of Comparative Sociology, History of Psychiatry, The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, and Social and Legal Studies. Dr. Watson has served as a consultant for the Ontario Ministry of Health, and the Ministry of the Solicitor General, Canada.

 

ENG296Y0 Topics in English Literature: Shakespeare

ENG296Y0 Topics in English Literature: Shakespeare

What’s so great about Shakespeare? This question will be the starting point for a course in which you will have the opportunity to learn everything you ever wanted to know, and to ask every question you ever wanted to ask, about Shakespeare—as well as to learn things and ask questions that you had never thought of before. We will read four or five plays and you will be introduced to a variety of techniques for describing, with clarity and precision and maybe even some personal style, the artistic qualities and effects of these works and the nature and significance of your responses to them. Readings: Four or five plays, to be determined partly by what’s playing at the theatres we visit. Texts are likely to include at least two of the following: Richard II, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Macbeth, Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet, and Cymbeline.  

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE
Exclusion: ENG220Y
BR=1
ENG296Y0 Draft Course Outline 

Virtual Field Trips

Details TBC

Instructor

Katherine Williams is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Toronto, and her writing and teaching focuses on drama by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, disability studies, performance theory, and Global Shakespeare. She has published a range of articles on these topics, writing extensively about Shakespeare’s Richard III, and she edited the 1605 play Eastward Ho, written by George Chapman, Ben Jonson, and John Marston, for The Routledge Anthology of Early Modern Drama, published in 2020. Her book, Unfixable Forms: Disability, Performance, and the Early Modern English Theater, will be published by Cornell University Press in 2021. 

 

HIS343Y0 History of Modern Intelligence

HIS343Y0 History of Modern Intelligence

How have spies shaped the past, and how will they shape the future? HIS343 explores the rise of modern intelligence over the long 20th century, from Anglo-Russian competition before World War I through to the post-9/11 era. Students will study the contribution of intelligence services to victories and defeats in war, and their role in times of peace. The course will also examine the relationship between intelligence services and their society. What do we really know about espionage – and how do we know what we know? 

This is an intensive virtual class. Although we cannot visit some of the key historical sites in person because of COVID-19, we will take advantage of the recent digitization of recently declassified intelligence materials from several different time periods and intelligence organizations around the world. Students will read primary source accounts of intelligence operations and examine and compare notable intelligence analyses from a range of global primary sources, students will work with original intelligence materials to gain an introduction into the history of modern intelligence.

Prerequisite

Prerequisites: None
Recommended Preparation: HIS103Y1 or an equivalent introduction to modern international relations
Breadth Requirement = 3
HIS343Y0 Course Outline - Draft

Virtual Field Trips

  • The Central Intelligence Agency's Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Reading Room
  • The declassified archives of the UK Secret Service (M15) held at the National Archives of the United Kingdom
  • Virtual exhibits available from Bletchley Park, home of the UK's Second World War codebreaking establishment

Instructor

Timothy Andrews Sayle  is Assistant Professor of History and Director of the International Relations Program at the University of Toronto. He is an expert on modern global security and his research focuses on intelligence, nuclear weapons, and national security decision-making. In 2019, he published two books. Enduring Alliance: A History of NATO and the Postwar Global Order, studies the postwar alliance system and was based on research in 18 archives. Another book, The Last Card: Inside George W. Bush’s Decisions to Surge in Iraq, was based on oral history interviews with over two dozen members of the Bush administration. He founded “Canada Declassified,” an online web resource for recently declassified documents, and co-founded the Canadian Foreign Intelligence History Project. 

 

PSY306Y0 Special Topics in Psychology: Disability – Culture and Inclusion

PSY306Y0 Special Topics in Psychology: Disability – Culture and Inclusion

This course is an interdisciplinary seminar on the life-long development of individuals with exceptionalities. Topics include controversial social and educational issues (e.g., inclusion vs. segregation), legal, family and economic issues, disability across the lifespan, communication disorders, hearing and visual impairment, autism, and acquired brain injury. Special emphasis will be placed on the social and historical factors that play a determining role as to whether impairment leads to the psychological experience of disability. 

Prerequisite

Prerequisites: Registration in any Psychology or Social Science Major or Specialist and completion of 8.0 FCE
Exclusions: UTM: PSY345H5, 442Y5
Breadth Requirement = None.
PSY306Y0 – Course Outline (updated April 6, 2021)

Virtual Field Trips

Details TBC

Instructor

Dr. Stuart Kamenetsky is Full Professor, Teaching Stream, and serves as the Director of the Psychology Undergraduate Program at the University of Toronto Mississauga. He teaches courses on disability, cross cultural psychology, and child development, and carries out research on the perception of disability images, building social capital (http://buildingsocialcapital.org/) and on student accommodation in post-secondary education. As an advocate for people with disabilities he delivers public talks on social inclusion. He has spent many years supporting people with disabilities in a variety of social service agencies as well as the child welfare system. He is well connected with school boards, provincial residential schools and agencies where his students gain practical experience in the field. He has taught this course numerous times in England, Italy, and Japan.